From one teen to another: Saving a friends’ life means speaking up

by Dee Sarton

KTVB.COM

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BOISE — Like a lot of young adults, Kaitlyn Carpenter has a tattoo, “It says ‘I’m the hero of this story.’ I got it my senior year because of everything I went through.”

This BSU freshman is a survivor, and now she’s helping others survive the very real danger of depression and suicidal thoughts.

“It’s extremely terrifying not to be able to trust your own mind,” said Carpenter.

Kaitlyn has dealt with depression since she was in high school. At first, she did what a lot of teens do, reached out to friends and often in the middle of the night with a text.

“It wasn’t until I went though treatment that I realized how dangerous it was to only rely on friends for support,” Carpenter said.

Now she shares her story and her warning to adolescents in schools and churches. Her biggest concern is that teens are texting in their darkest hour — a form of communication that is superficial and doesn’t convey the possible urgency of the moment.

“I would say the number one reason these kids who receive texts don’t say anything is because they feel an obligation to text them until they go to sleep then count that as a victory if they don’t hurt themselves and they feel an obligation not to say anything about it and keep it to themselves,” said Carpenter. “It’s a game that’s so dangerous, It’s becoming deadly and that’s something I want high school kids in particular to understand.”